audio-intl

The making of a Classic Record LP

Step 1: Take an ori­gi­nal ses­si­on tape from a le­gen­da­ry per­for­mance by a high­ly ta­len­ted ar­tist(s) to Ber­nie Grund­man Mas­te­ring in Hol­ly­wood, CA.
Step 2: Ber­nie „The Wi­zard“ Grund­man will trans­fer (cut) the music from the tape to a lac­quer with ex­tre­me care after hours of di­rect com­pa­ri­son against nu­merous co­pies of dif­fe­rent pres­sings of ori­gi­nal LP’s. (In an at­tempt to pre­ser­ve the in­ten­ti­ons of the ori­gi­nal pro­du­cer(s), in terms of the equa­liza­t­i­on that was often ap­p­lied to the ori­gi­nal LP’s).

Ber­nie Grund­man and Tony Haw­kins at the con­so­le cut­ting a lac­quer.

Step 3: Take the fresh­ly groo­ved lac­quer to the pla­ting plant as quick­ly as pos­si­ble. It will be „sil­ve­r­ed“ and elec­tro­pla­ted in „the ba­thes“ to pro­du­ce a mas­ter, which is re-pla­ted to pro­du­ce „Mo­thers“, which are fur­ther re-pla­ted to pro­du­ce stam­pers, which are used to press re­cor­ds.
Step 4: While stam­pers are being made, ori­gi­nal re­cord co­vers and la­bels must be scan­ned into a com­pu­ter, di­gi­tal­ly en­han­ced and „clea­ned up“, and out­put to film in order to print ja­ckets and la­bels must be de­li­ve­r­ed to the pres­sing plant prior to the pro­duc­tion run.

Max Mes­ser­schmidt in­spec­ting press pro­ofs for LP la­bels.

Step 5: Press samp­le LP’s with a set of stam­pers (one per side). Lis­ten to the test pres­sings on a num­ber of re­fe­rence sys­tems to as­sess sten­gths and weak­nes­ses. If there are no pro­blems, the pro­duc­tion run can begin. If de­fects are found, re­turn to ‚Step 1‘.

The making of a Classic Record LP

Step 1: Take an ori­gi­nal ses­si­on tape from a le­gen­da­ry per­for­mance by a high­ly ta­len­ted ar­tist(s) to Ber­nie Grund­man Mas­te­ring in Hol­ly­wood, CA.
Step 2: Ber­nie „The Wi­zard“ Grund­man will trans­fer (cut) the music from the tape to a lac­quer with ex­tre­me care after hours of di­rect com­pa­ri­son against nu­merous co­pies of dif­fe­rent pres­sings of ori­gi­nal LP’s. (In an at­tempt to pre­ser­ve the in­ten­ti­ons of the ori­gi­nal pro­du­cer(s), in terms of the equa­liza­t­i­on that was often ap­p­lied to the ori­gi­nal LP’s).

Ber­nie Grund­man and Tony Haw­kins at the con­so­le cut­ting a lac­quer.

Step 3: Take the fresh­ly groo­ved lac­quer to the pla­ting plant as quick­ly as pos­si­ble. It will be „sil­ve­r­ed“ and elec­tro­pla­ted in „the ba­thes“ to pro­du­ce a mas­ter, which is re-pla­ted to pro­du­ce „Mo­thers“, which are fur­ther re-pla­ted to pro­du­ce stam­pers, which are used to press re­cor­ds.
Step 4: While stam­pers are being made, ori­gi­nal re­cord co­vers and la­bels must be scan­ned into a com­pu­ter, di­gi­tal­ly en­han­ced and „clea­ned up“, and out­put to film in order to print ja­ckets and la­bels must be de­li­ve­r­ed to the pres­sing plant prior to the pro­duc­tion run.

Max Mes­ser­schmidt in­spec­ting press pro­ofs for LP la­bels.

Step 5: Press samp­le LP’s with a set of stam­pers (one per side). Lis­ten to the test pres­sings on a num­ber of re­fe­rence sys­tems to as­sess sten­gths and weak­nes­ses. If there are no pro­blems, the pro­duc­tion run can begin. If de­fects are found, re­turn to ‚Step 1‘.

LP-Katalog